COSTS OF DONKEY KEEPING from Teamdonk’s perspective

Teamdonk's Feed Program, click on photos to enlarge them

 What do you suppose it costs to feed the Teamdonk’s feed program?  That’s been one of those nagging questions I’ve been dealing with and struggling to come up with an answer.  While doing 2011 taxes just for kicks I totaled up each individual item that goes into the recipe and then divided that by 365 to get a daily cost.  I think this turned out to be pretty accurate.  Since I only feed flax twice a week I did have to calculate that a little differently. 

I came up with a total of $1.91 per animal per day to feed everything that goes into the beet pulp recipe.  Adding flax brings the cost up to $1.99 per animal per feeding.

Here is the breakdown of the cost of each item per feeding:

Beet Pulp………………………. $.47

Oats ……………………………. $ .21

Mares Match ……………….. $ .65

Horse Guard ………………… $ .45

Magnesium Oxide ………… $ .06

Wheat Bran …………………. $ .03

Molasses …………………….. $ .04

This totals up to $ 1.91 per donkey.  Flax Seed added to the mix is $ .08 which brings that feeding up to $1.99. That’s $703.56 per donkey per year. 

Note:  Purina’s Mares Match is the milk replacer and Horse Guard is the vitamin mineral supplement.

Now What Is Wrong Here…

Items grown and manufactured in Idaho include Beet Pulp, Oats, Wheat Bran and Molasses.  The Beet Pulp I buy comes from S.D., Oats from MO, Wheat Bran is from KS, and the Molasses is from LA.  Why I ask why????  Sure makes no sense to me!  It’s just like trying to buy Idaho Russet Potatoes at the local grocery store… NO, I have to go out of state to get my Russets!  Lamb comes from Australia, not the USA and certainly not in Idaho, where I grew up on a sheep outfit!

Those rising costs could be slowed down if we could illuminate the expensive shipping.  To make matters worse MN is the headquarters of one of our local feed stores, so in all reality they are not going to care about those rising transportation costs.  It simply boils down to doing the best we can for our animals.

 Here is another little interesting tidbit I discovered.  Items purchased yearly include Magnesium Oxide, Molasses, Wheat Bran and Flax Seed.  Horse Guard is purchased quarterly or four times a year.  Just interesting to note that I went through sixteen bags of beet pulp and eight bags of oats for our four mammoth donkeys in 2011.

Now to take this to the next step in 2011 it cost $ 77.15 to worm each donkey.  That included a 5 day double dose wormer plus their regular wormings.

Farrier Costs were $350.00 for all four donkeys.  I could go on and on but my point is that when we take on the care of an animal whether it be as an individual or a rescue organization you need to know what the costs will amount to and that you are going to be able to provide the basics for them.

These are some of the basic care costs excluding hay, vet care or any of the accessories you want to provide them with.  The payback is overwhelming donkey music, hugs and kisses.  Is it worth it….absolutely, is it a commitment…YES!

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About Teamdonk

Teamdonk is all about Kristi's three driving and riding donkeys. Join us as we share our adventures. Meet the boys Luc, Galahad and Merlin. Don't forget to visit the older blogs at www.teamdonk.wordpress.com, 2010, 2011, 2012 13 & 14 add the year like this www.2015teamdonk.wordpress.com
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4 Responses to COSTS OF DONKEY KEEPING from Teamdonk’s perspective

  1. Maplecroft Farm, says:

    ++
    Nice to know the breakdown. Although, for us, we do not feed anything special to our draft Mules. They are fat and healthy, have very good feet, and coats on just pasture and hay. No grain at all.

    • Teamdonk says:

      I really don’t know of any mule folks who do feed extra. It’s that wonderful hybrid thing that makes them better than their parents, don’t ya think? Thanks for the comment!

  2. Mel N.Y. says:

    I don’t dare add up what the donkeys cost, I know it would scare me! But yes, its worth it.

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